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megpie71

June 2017

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megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Sunday, April 9th, 2017 01:47 pm
Sorry this is so late today - my body decided to object strenuously to last night's dinner, and I've been dealing with that. So, three things from my news feeds about what went right.

Surfing as therapy for autism: Ocean Heroes charity helps children find connection by Eliza Laschon

A short profile of the Ocean Heroes charity, and their work with kids with autism.

Basque separatists give up weapons in 'historic' peace move by AP (uncredited)

The Basque separatist group, ETA, has revealled the locations of eight caches of weapons, through the mediation group "Peace Artisans". This is the second-to-last step of a process of of peace creation in the Basque region demanded jointly by France and Spain.

Minecraft morphed into game to help kids and parents deal with onset of diabetes by Nick Wiggins (ABC Queensland)

Josh Wulf has adapted the popular game "Minecraft" to help kids who have been newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes learn the rituals of monitoring their glucose and insulin levels.

So there's my three for the day. Again, sorry about the delay.
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Saturday, April 8th, 2017 09:51 am
Running a bit late this morning - I got caught up in doing some creative work (first time in ages I've been even vaguely inspired, so I wanted to get as much as possible down before it all ran off). Sorry about the delay, but here's the three items about what went right from my news feeds.

How to read a dress: Ways women's clothes tell the story of Western societies through the ages by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A brief profile of the work of Perth academic Lydia Edwards, and her new book "How To Read A Dress".

Country football code sets standards on employment, domestic violence and children's education by Vanessa Mills and Ben Collins (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

The East Kimberley Football League is attempting to use participation in AFL football clubs as a way of leveraging participation in social change in remote communities through their new code of conduct. There are standards around participation in employment or looking for work, avoidance of domestic violence, and attempting to get and keep kids in school which potential players are being asked to meet.

Early onset dementia could be a life sentence, but for Andy Creighan it came as a relief by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

A profile of Andy Creighan, who was diagnosed with early onset dementia at age 54, but still manages to have a full and busy life despite the inevitable cognitive difficulties.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about what went right in your news feed, why not share it in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Friday, April 7th, 2017 09:10 am
Only another ten days of this project left - it finishes on 17 April this year. But while it lasts, I'll still be putting up three links per day to stories about "what went right" from my news feeds. Here's today's:

First ocean-grown abalone farm for Esperance expected to be up and running by end of year by Tara de Landgraaft (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

"Proponents behind the Esperance region's first ocean-grown abalone enterprise hope to be up and running by the end of the year."

Space Gandalf: Who is Greg Quicke — the man behind the beard — and where did he come from? by Gemma Deavin and Jennifer King (ABC Western Plains, ABC New South Wales)

A profile of Greg Quicke, one of the rising stars of the ABC's "Stargazing Live" program.

The WA youth camp transforming teens' lives by Lisa Morrison, Andrew Collins and Bridget Fitzgerald (ABC Great Southern, ABC Western Australia)

Tanya Dupagne, the founder of Camp Kulin, has been awarded the WA Rural Woman of the Year Award.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your newsfeed, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Yay)
Thursday, April 6th, 2017 09:17 am
The weather today is grey and foggy (winter is coming... eventually). Have three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds to help perk up a grey day.

Students building and racing solar-powered miniature cars to get enthused about STEM by Sarah Collard (ABC Western Australia)

The Science Teachers Association of Western Australia (STAWA) and Synergy have teamed up with around 60 schools from around Western Australia to teach students about science, mathematics, engineering, and technology through the medium of building and racing miniature solar-powered cars.

Cutting-edge conservation: Using drones to monitor ecological restoration in the Gondwana Link by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

The Gondwana Link bush corridor project aims to reconnect areas between Margaret River and the Nullarbor Plain by providing a corridor of reclaimed agricultural land where native plants and animals can flourish. Bush Heritage Australia, the group which is administering the project, are excited by the potential of using flying drones to assist in tasks such as monitoring the extent of vegetation, determining the fire history of an area, and possibly even monitoring for wildlife presence.

Older workers happiest at work and money less important, Australian study finds by Matthew Bamford (ABC Australia)

Researchers from Curtin University have completed a study of over 17,000 workers across Australia, trying to determine the keys to job satisfaction, and are reporting older workers (particularly those over 70) tend to be happier in work than younger ones, workers who are happier with their jobs report taking home lower wages than those who aren't as happy, and that Tasmania leads the country in several key job satisfaction indicators.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about what went right in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 09:46 am
Another day, another three things from my news feeds about what went right.

Surfers train to save lives at WA beaches when life savers not on duty by Nicolas Perpitch (ABC Western Australia)

Surfers tend to be at more beaches than surf life savers, and they're generally there for longer than the surf life savers can manage as well. So Surfing WA and Surf Life Saving WA have joined forces with a free program to give surfers enough first aid knowledge to be useful in a crisis.

Meet Mia Davies, Australia's first female Nationals leader by Eliza Borello (AM, ABC Western Australia)

A profile of Mia Davies, the leader of the WA Nationals (which are now unique for two factors - firstly, their lack of a coalition with the Liberals, and now, their election of a female leader).

Latest Helicobacter pylori breakthrough could lead to eradication of bacteria by Tom Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

A team of researchers led by Professor Barry Marshall (who was the joint winner of the Nobel in 2005 for the discovery of helicobacter pylori) is conducting further study on the bacteria, with the overall aim of being able to find methods of treating h.pylori infection.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story in your news feeds about what went right, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Yay)
Tuesday, April 4th, 2017 07:34 am
As previously stated, this series is going to be winding up in just under 2 weeks (17 April). So, I'm making the most of the last few days of the process. Here's today's selection of stories from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Culture key to suicide prevention among Indigenous Australians, experts say, ahead of global discussion by Andie Noonan (ABC Victoria)

This isn't so much a "what went right" as "what's got the potential to go right". Australia's indigenous suicide rate is very high - indigenous Australians are up to five times more likely to take their own lives than non-indigenous. There are hopes that experts from other countries with colonised indigenous populations, such as New Zealand and Canada, can offer techniques and perspectives for suicide prevention which may prove successful, but in the meantime, one thing which is working here in Australia is forging stronger connections with Indigenous cultures and with the land, as a tool for hope.

Australia's numbat population boosted after successful breeding in WA by Sarah Tallier (ABC Mid West and Wheatbelt, Western Australia)

Numbats from two zoos which were transported to Mount Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary (a zone fenced off to exclude feral predators) appear to have settled in well, and are breeding.

Sydney's Addison Hotel opens its doors to homeless youth in Australian first by Paige Cockburn

The Addison Hotel in Kensington, Sydney, was sitting idle while a development plan waits on approval. Rather than waste the opportunity, the building's owner has offered the space to accommodate homeless youth - 42 fully-furnished rooms, each with their own bathroom and kitchenette.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Monday, April 3rd, 2017 07:38 am
Well, I've only fourteen more of these to go - better make 'em good! So here's three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Dementia patients using robots, virtual reality to engage by Rebecca Turner (ABC Western Australia)

Contains video footage. People in dementia care in a number of facilities in Perth are receiving assistance from technological measures to help them feel more comfortable with interacting. These includes things like humanoid robots, virtual reality goggles, and virtual walls.

Remote WA communities cut off by flooding for months by Erin Parke (ABC Western Australia)

While there's concern about towns in New South Wales and Queensland which have been recently inundated by flood-waters, spare a thought for the folks in remote communities in WA's Kimberley, who have been largely isolated for about three months as a result of the big "wet" this year. While it's an expected part of the seasonal flow up there (so people start stockpiling food and fuel from about October and November onward) it's been a bit more intense than expected this year, so folks are giving a sigh of relief as the dirt roads start to dry out and become accessible again.

Albany-based whisky distillery gears up for national competition with 'millennia-old' local peat by Sean Murphy (Landline, ABC Western Australia)

A peat bog which was a liability for prime lamb and marron producer Richard Hughes is now "black gold" - a key ingredient in the Great Southern Distillery's prize-winning Limeburners single malt whisky.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right", why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Sunday, April 2nd, 2017 10:03 am
Hi all,

I'm not doing a "what went right" post today. Instead, I'm going to be talking about the future of the series.

I'm sure you have noticed the times the posts are going up have been varying wildly over the last few weeks. Essentially, what's happening is I'm discovering that being at university is taking a toll on my spoon level I hadn't expected - I'm winding up physically and mentally exhausted by study to a greater degree than I expected, and something has to give. The thing which is "giving" at present is my sleep cycle - I'm finding instead of being able to get away with about 6 - 7 hours, I'm needing the full 8, sometimes 9 hours per night. Given I put these posts up in the morning not long after I get up, they're getting pushed further and further back as my need for rest increases. There are other side effects of this physical and mental exhaustion as well - suffice it to say, I'm going to have to stop posting "What Went Right" because I need the spoons it occupies for other things.

I'm currently thinking of finishing up this series on 17 April. It will have been a four month run (from 18 December 2016) and that's a pretty solid duration for one of my projects. I'm disappointed at not being able to keep it going for longer, but unfortunately, between the demands of university and the constraints of mental illness, I'm finding the whole thing to be creating more stress for me than it's resolving. Again, something has to give, and this is the thing I can shed from my load with the least adverse consequences to myself.
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Neat)
Saturday, April 1st, 2017 09:30 am
Happy April Fools' Day. Have three stories about "What went right" from my news feeds.

Commercial merino ewes hit record prices in Western Australia by Michelle Stanley (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

A new record high price for commercial merino ewes has been set in WA's Great Southern Region. There's been a short supply of quality breeding ewes; thus the high prices.

Western Australia's inland lakes become breeding grounds for thousands of waterbirds by Eliza Wood (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

In the wake of all the rain which fell in the North of WA over the last few months, a lot of the inland lakes have filled. This has attracted water birds from all over to breed.

Inside the Square Kilometre Array by Anne Jones (Off Track, ABC Australia)

A profile of various people and places associated with the Square Kilometre Array telescope in Western Australia. (This includes the traditional custodians of the land, as well as astronomers and computer scientists).

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share it in the comments?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Friday, March 31st, 2017 10:13 am
Another month over already? Where does the time go? Have three stories about "what went right" from my news feed to help you through the day.

Cyclone Debbie: Airlie Beach and Proserpine locals pull together despite lack of power, water by Katherine Gregory (AM, ABC Australia)

The towns of Airlie Beach and Prosperine were directly in the path of Cyclone Debbie, and have suffered extensive damage. However, locals are starting to work to clean up the mess, and are working to help each other out.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews flags legal changes after meeting teen 'humiliated' by rape court case by ABC Victoria (uncredited)

The Premier of Victoria has met with a young woman who was raped, and who wound up dropping the court case against the men who raped her due to re-victimisation by the court system. She and her mother are campaigning for reform to the legal system in regard to rape cases to reduce the future likelihood of re-victimisation.

#SnapthatStigma: Children in state care speak out during campaign to fight stereotypes by Angelique Donnellan (ABC South Australia)

Kids in state care have a lot of extra stuff to deal with in their lives on top of the standard load of growing up and becoming adults. One of the things they're forced to deal with is the stigma of being "in care". A group of eight of them have spoken up about living with and dealing with this stigma in a video produced by the Create Foundation.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story in your news feeds about "what went right", why not share it in the comments?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Thursday, March 30th, 2017 12:18 pm
Yeah, this is late today (I've been having a bit of a slow start to the day). But there's still at least three things which went right in my news feed, and here they are:

From foster kid to hopeful surgeon: Young people in care recognised for achievements by Eliza Laschon (ABC Western Australia)

This article profiles three of the 25 winners of the Perth Airport Achiever Awards, a grant of $4000, given to young people who have been in care, or who have left care, and who are looking to continue education and training.

Lizards quick to snap up 1080 baits meant for WA wild dogs by Eliza Wood (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

Pastoralists and farmers have been saying for years that 1080 baits are ineffective against wild dogs in WA, because the dogs don't take them. Now research out of Murdoch University is proving them right - not only are the baits usually quickly snapped up by varanids (monitor lizards) as well as other species such as ravens, kangaroos, ants and feral cats; but even when the lizards go into hibernation for the winter, the dogs aren't eating the baits in the first place.

Quokkas thriving on Rottnest Island despite increased tourism, study finds by Charlotte Hamlyn

The quokkas of Rottnest Island have been notorious ever since Willem de Vlamingh first mistook them for rats and named the island for them (the literal translation from the Dutch is "rat's nest"). But very little has been known about the population (despite them getting an online reputation as "the happiest animal in the world") until recently, when researcher Veronica Phillips undertook the first thorough study of the quokka population there in about forty years, in order to find out whether tourism on the island is harming them.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share it in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Wednesday, March 29th, 2017 09:49 am
Another day, another three things about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Gravity Discovery Centre observatory: a place to explore the wonders of the cosmos and origins of life by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A profile piece about the Gravity Discovery Centre observatory at Gingin, and its senior astronomer, Richard Tonello.

Hardy inland spangled perch make the most of heavy WA rains as desert creek beds turn to rivers by Rachel Day (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

A chance discovery of small fish flipping about on the side of a flooded road in the Goldfields reveals the spangled perch - a desert fish which is incredibly hardy and can survive a wide range of conditions.

Young WA farming family grows eco-house out of cereal crop by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

The Maesepp-Potter family in Katanning live in an off-grid, straw-bale house they built from materials sourced on their working sheep and grain farm (the straw-bales were barley straw grown on the farm, the thermal walls are rock sourced from the northern end of their property). They're opening the doors of their home to the public as part of the Great Southern Sustainable Living festival.

So there's my three for the day. If you've seen any articles about what went right in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Tuesday, March 28th, 2017 07:34 am
My best wishes for anyone in Northern Queensland reading this - here's hoping Cyclone Debbie turns out to be a bit less ferocious than expected. In the meantime, here's the three things from my newsfeeds about what went right.

Kimberley abattoir resumes production after big wet season by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The only abbatoir in the north-west of Australia, at Yeeda Station between Broome and Derby, has re-opened after the wet season.

'Energy-harvesting' clear glass created by Perth team by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

The Electron Science Research Institute at Edith Cowan University, and local firm ClearVue technologies have worked together to create a commercially viable, clear, solar glass. The glass contains special nanoparticles, with solar cells around its borders, and can block the UV and infra-red components of sunlight transferring those energies to the solar cells to create energy, while passing the visible light through to provide illumination.

World's biggest dinosaur footprints found in north-western Australia by Ben Collins (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

Footprints of sauropod dinosaurs, measuring at up to 1.7m in length, have been documented in the north-west of Western Australia, on the coastline north of Broome. They're one of up to 21 different types of dinosaurs represented in the area.

So there's my three for the day. If you've spotted a story about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "Heee!" (Hee)
Monday, March 27th, 2017 07:39 am
Bit rushed today, but still able to fit in three things which went right from my newsfeeds.

Earthquake rattles Darwin after striking 600km away in Banda Sea by Xavier La Canna (ABC Radio Darwin, Northern Territory)

A magnitude 5.3 earthquake in the Banda Sea rattled Darwin at about 4.44am (ACST), but isn't likely to have caused much damage.

Is Australia on the brink of becoming a completely cashless society? by Michael Edwards (ABC AM, Australia)

It's rumoured Australia could become a cashless society as early as 2020, with the Reserve Bank's roll-out of the NPP (New Payment Platform) happening today looking to be a big step in the process.

Study shows fibre supplements could be used as asthma treatment by Justine Kearney (ABC Australia)

A small preliminary study (with a sample group of 17 asthmatics) has had encouraging results with the use of soluble fibre supplements as a way of treating or controlling asthma. The researchers involved are now looking to broaden their study to a much wider sample group.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found an article in your news feed about what went right, why not share it in the comments to boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Sunday, March 26th, 2017 10:10 am
I feel I've been saying "good grief, where does the year go?" a lot lately. But really - the end of March already? Feels like just yesterday was the beginning of January. Anyway, have another three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Pearl producers turn wasted by-product into seafood delicacy by Tyne Logan (ABC Western Australia)

Great Southern Shellfish, based in Albany, have started selling pearl oysters which are unsuitable for producing pearls as oysters for eating. The akoya oysters, which are raised in beds where other seafood for consumption are grown, are reported as tasting more like abalone than rock oyster, but local chefs are giving the product the thumbs-up.

Dance Academy writer Samantha Strauss says creating children's TV isn't all fun and games by Jade Macmillan (ABC Australia)

Samantha Strauss, the co-creator of ABC TV series Dance Academy, uses her own experience as a dancer to inform the way she writes the show. The series has spawned a film version, which is picking up eighteen months on from where the TV show left off.

Keeping South Australia's' Barossa Deutsch alive over kaffee und kuchen by Simon Royal (ABC South Australia)

Efforts are being made to keep the Barossa Deutsch (the dialect of German which evolved in the Barossa valley) alive by getting people who speak the language together for "kaffe und kuchen" (coffee and cakes). Professor Peter Mickan, a linguist, also interviews the remaining native speakers of the language, gaining knowledge of the language from them by this means.

So there's my three stories for the day. If you've found any articles about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Saturday, March 25th, 2017 08:59 am
Ah, it's Saturday, and I have plans to spend a lot of time doing very little. But I still have time to find three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Loggerhead turtles at Gnaraloo enjoy bumper nesting season in boost for endangered species by Sarah Tallier (ABC Western Australia)

It's been a bumper nesting season for loggerhead turtles this year at Gnaraloo, on the Ningaloo coast - over four hundred nests have been spotted this season.

World Science Festival: Reef twilight zone offers coral and species protection by Maudy Veltema (ABC Queensland)

When we talk of coral reefs, we often think of shallow, warm water - but corals can live at depths up to 700m below the surface. Dr Tom Bridge, senior curator of Queensland Museum, studies coral species and ecosystems in the tricky-to study mesophotic zone between 50m to 150m underwater.

US Air Force installs remote-controlled telescope in Western Australia to monitor space junk by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

The US Air Force is trying to keep track of approximately 20,000 human-manufactured objects in space, in order to try and either prevent, predict or deal with the fall-out of collisions between them. This latest telescope in Gingin is part of the Falcon project, which is aimed at giving the US air force oversight of all objects larger than 10cm in Earth's orbit.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share a link to it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Friday, March 24th, 2017 08:27 am
Another week almost over. Have three stories from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Kimberley's iconic 'prison tree' never used as holding cell for Aboriginal prisoners by Vanessa Mills and Leah McLennan (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

This is less of a "what went right" and more of a "setting the record right". The so-called "prison boab" outside Derby in Western Australia has never actually been used as a holding cell for prisoners. Research by Dr Elizabeth Grant of the University of Adelaide is indicating the tree may, instead, be a sacred interment site for the local Aboriginal people, and Dr Grant is calling for efforts to be made to protect the tree as such.

Synlight: Germany fires up 'world's largest artificial sun' in push for climate-friendly energy by AP (uncredited)

The world's largest "artificial sun" has been created in Germany in an effort to see whether there might be a commercially viable way of using sunlight to generate hydrogen.

DNA repair discovery could lead to drugs to reverse ageing, fight cancer and help space travel by Jake Sturmer (national science reporter, ABC Australia)

An international research team has identified a critical step in the way cells repair DNA, bringing us closer to a point where anti-ageing drugs may well be theoretically possible.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments and boost the signal? There's more going right out there than we'd think at first scan of the news.
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 10:09 am
I'm going to be having a busy day today - housework and study combined. But I'm not too busy to stop and look for three articles about "what went right" in my mainstream media feeds. Here they are.

Night parrot sighting in Western Australia shocks birdwatching world by Ann Jones ("Off Track", RN, ABC Western Australia)

The photo is of the south end of a north-bound bird which looks like a rather plump yellow budgie. But it's a night parrot - a bird which was presumed to be extinct until about four years ago; and it was up near Broome in Western Australia, about 2000 km from their current known habitat in Western Queensland. One thing for certain, night parrots are full of surprises!

Pilot clean-up program hailed as answer to Western Australia's abandoned mines by Sam Tomlin (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

The WA Department of Mines and Petroleum says its growing Mine Rehabilitation Fund is the answer to the question of what happens when mining finishes or stops abruptly, and leaves a minesite needing to be rehabilitated. The fund, which consists of a levy of 1% on the annual profits of any mining company in Western Australia, has been running since 2013, and is intended to cover the costs of rehabilitation and clean-up. So far, it's been used to cover the rehabilitation costs of the Pro Force gold mine near Coolgardie, and the Black Diamond coal mine near Collie.

Mouldy food could be a thing of the past thanks to Murdoch University research by Sarah Collard

Research at Murdoch University by Dr Kirsty Bayliss is aimed at finding the optimal type of plasma flame to treat various types of food (fruit, bread, meat, grains, dairy products) in order to prevent mould infections. At present, they're focussing on avocados, and finding some interesting results. The plasma flame not only kills off the mould spores on the surface of fruit, but also appears to stimulate a resistance response within the fruit itself.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Neat)
Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 09:22 am
Winter is coming here in Australia - we've passed the autumnal equinox, and things are going to be getting cooler and wetter down in the south of the country (cooler and drier up in the north, where they're going into the Dry). Which means for those of you in the Northern Hemisphere, spring is on the way (and probably springing already!). Anyway, enough of these tedious meteorological details - let's get on to the stories about what went right.

Vietnamese refugee with big heart builds life and helps community in Western Australia by Gian De Poloni (ABC South West WA)

This article is a profile of Hien Le, a former refugee who fled Vietnam in 1982, and who has built up a life in Western Australia, teaching herself English by watching "Days of Our Lives" and "The Young and The Restless". She also spends time helping Vietnamese girls who have moved to Australia for a shot at a better life.

Tropical Forestry Services becomes Quintis as the company shifts focus by Clint Jasper (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

In a market plagued by organised crime and fraud, Australian company Quintis hopes to be able to build a brand reputation as a reliable supplier of sustainable, ethically sourced sandalwood timber and oil. They're also running a company in the USA which is trialling sandalwood oil as a treatment for various skin conditions.

WA's dinosaur coast: Bid to protect Broome's ancient footprints after maps published by Erin Parke (ABC 7.30, Western Australia)

A map is being produced as a result of field research by a team from the University of Queensland into the dinosaur tracks around Broome. This may provide opportunities for increased tourism around the footprints, although local Aboriginal families are concerned about the potential for damage, and even theft. This concern is shared by the local Dinosaur Coast Management Group, who are a group of concerned locals aiming to protect the trackways.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right", why not share them in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "Heee!" (Hee)
Tuesday, March 21st, 2017 07:47 am
Happy autumnal equinox to everyone in the southern hemisphere. Happy vernal equinox to all of you in the northern hemisphere. And in celebration, have three articles about "What Went Right" from my news feeds.

Wine yields doubled in parts of Western Australia, but rain takes shine off the 2016 vintage by Michelle Stanley (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

It's been a good year for vineyards in WA, with some areas in Margaret River approximately doubling their harvest from their vines.

Blaze Aid helping flooded West Australian farmers get back on their feet by Tara de Landgrafft (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

The aid group "Blaze Aid", formed in the wake of the bushfires which took out Yarloop last year, is now providing assistance for farmers who were flooded out by heavy rains about five weeks ago. The group provides assistance in replacing or re-erecting fences, and they're currently working on about 50km of fencing in the Lake Grace area, with an expectation of more to come.

Diabetes sufferers swimming their way to a healthier lifestyle by Charlotte Hamlyn (ABC Western Australia)

The Swimming365 group is going to be entering a team in the "Port to Pub" event (which starts at Leighton beach, and ends at the Rottnest hotel). The group is composed of people who have started swimming as a way of either avoiding or dealing with type 2 diabetes, and this is the first time they've entered a team in the event.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story or two about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share a link in the comments?