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megpie71

May 2017

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megpie71: Photo of sign reading "Those who throw objects at the crocodiles will be asked to retrieve them." (Crocodiles)
Saturday, May 20th, 2017 10:30 am
This week's fun thing was starting to play Möbius Final Fantasy on my tablet. I'd originally got interested reading about it on Steam, and tried downloading it for the PC, but got a message saying "this isn't available for your platform" (presumably the PC version doesn't work on Windows 10?). So I decided, sod this, I'll get it on the tablet instead.

Ramble/review of FFM beneath )

Other than that: winter continues apace - it started raining yesterday, and is forecast to keep raining for most of the next week or so. I've regained a lot of my spoons from the past few weeks - I'm back to cooking again, and I'm starting to get back into the routine of housework. Given we're forecast to have a rental inspection at some point this month, that's just as well, really. Oh, and one of the cabinet doors for the cupboard beneath the sink fell off - the weight of the door pulled the screws holding the upper hinge out of the wood they were anchored in. Given the doors have been falling out of alignment for a while now, to the point where closing them meant lifting them up and into position, I wasn't particularly surprised when it happened. Again, this place doesn't appear to have had any serious maintenance or non-urgent repair work done since my age was in single digits, so it's not surprising that when you put a couple of hefty doors onto a door-frame which is designed for something much lighter, the blasted things work themselves off in less than a year.

(For my non-Australian readers: welcome to the joys of renting in Australia, where asking the landlord for maintenance on the property can be essentially asking to find a new landlord - landlords evicting tenants for requesting maintenance is a known Thing here. Judging from the string of names - never the same name twice - we've noticed on the mail coming into the mailbox, it seems rather unlikely most tenants in this place stayed longer than about the standard six to twelve months of a fixed-term tenancy. Oh yes, that's another thing about renting in Australia - maximum fixed-term tenancy is twelve months at a stretch).

We're still continuing with the Caterpillar Cull, although the numbers are dropping somewhat. Their latest point of entry into the house is the bathroom, apparently through a finger-width gap in the skirting board down near the bathroom cabinet. Himself sprayed the area with surface spray yesterday, so we're going to see whether that works as a deterrent (it seems to, up to a point, in my room) and just keep picking them up and drowning 'em. These past couple of days, it's mostly been in the twenties per cull, so there's that. I've wound up buying a separate dustpan and brush set for the front verandah, so I can scrub the caterpillar guts off the existing one for inside the house.

We've also had the Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos coming by for their final shot at the under-ripe berries from the Cape Lilacs - which means the trees, which are starting to drop their leaves for winter, are starting to look just a tad bedraggled as a result. I hauled up a sucker from one of the front Cape Lilac trees earlier in the week, and I'm going to have to go and have a look around for any others.

Uni continues apace. I have one essay to finish, one five hundred word rationale and reflection to write, and a 1500 - 2000 word short story, personal essay, or feature article to write. The essay and the rationale/reflection are both due Monday week (29th of May), the short story is due the following week (8th of June). All of which is within my ability to do in the allotted time, so I'm not particularly worried about it. The more irritating item is being expected to find a feature article from a newspaper for my "Introduction to Writing" tutorial on Tuesday - mostly because I tend not to buy the newspaper on the grounds of it not being worth the money one spends on the wretched thing. Given the standard of Australian print journalism these days, I rather doubt there's going to be a feature article in the wretched thing anyway. Wonder whether my tutor would accept something from the online Grauniad - I know they do feature articles - quite a few of them, in fact.
megpie71: Unearthed skeleton, overlaid with phrase "What made you think I was nice?" (Bitch)
Saturday, May 13th, 2017 10:33 am
Yeah, I'm trying to do these weekly. We'll see how it lasts.

Winter is icumen in here in Western Australia - I woke up today to see fog in the valley heading down toward Berwick St, and the neighbours with the wood fire are starting to get some use out of it now the nights and mornings are getting chilly. My current level of rugging up: leggings under my jeans, jumper[1] over my long-sleeved t-shirt, and shoes and socks (I may dig out my ugg boots today, just for the fun of it; Saturday is "stay at home and play games" day, so I can dress the full slob if I want to).

I have a whole heap of stuff for uni I'm supposed to be working on at present (and this week's schedule was complicated by me needing to get to and start writing something I'd previously thought was due about two weeks later - discovered this on the Monday, had to have it in by Thursday). Fortunately for me, it was three five hundred word pieces, and I can do five hundred words in my sleep. So that's been submitted. The harder job for me was actually something where I have to do three hundred words plus/minus ten percent (so between 270 and 330 words) - in one case I was editing down something like 1000 words to 330, in another trying to knock things down from around the 500 word mark to the 300 word mark. What's worse, the brief for this second assignment only mentions a three hundred word minimum - it doesn't mention a maximum at all. So I wound up having to actually ask my tutor: okay, we have a minimum and no maximum stated; what is the unspoken maximum here? (And why they couldn't be bothered to just say: three hundred words, plus or minus ten percent?).

Things I learned this week: editing is hard mental work. I edited down three pieces to fit the word count, and I was exhausted by the end of it.

I'm still in recovery from the flu, but I managed to reclaim enough spoons yesterday to make cooking seem like a good idea. I have some Pumpkin Mulligatawny (basically, curried pumpkin soup, to which I plan to add rice and coconut milk) going in the slow cooker. I did a bit of preliminary work with the potato masher to get the veges broken up a bit, and I'm going to be running the stick blender through it in batches a bit later on.

The Great Caterpillar Cull continues, although it's dropped down to a mornings-only proceeding. Unfortunately, the wards appear to be breaking down, because I've started to find caterpillars coming back into my room again in the mornings (only one or two per day, but still... caterpillars). We're still getting over 30 caterpillars a day in the cull, and I suspect we're going to continue seeing those sorts of numbers for a long while yet.


[1] This is the Australian/British meaning of "jumper" - a knitted garment which covers the upper body; as distinct from a sweatshirt.
megpie71: a phone, ringing. (hardly working)
Saturday, May 6th, 2017 12:53 pm
Since I last wrote:

* I've spent about two weeks dealing with the flu and the after-effects of same.

* I've been going through a depressive patch (complete with mini-breakdown on Thursday).

* I haven't been eating well, due to said depressive patch (too tired to cook, which means a lot of meals for the past couple of weeks have been things like two minute noodles with chilli sauce, or tinned spaghetti with a bit of sriracha sauce, or similar.)

* I discovered going shopping while my depression!brain is in the middle of a "we don't deserve anything nice" kick is something of a vicious trip. It's surprisingly hard to buy convenience food (so I can have something vaguely nutritious I can just re-heat and eat when I'm feeling too damn tired and spoon-poor to cook) when my brain is basically looking at everything and going "you *know* how to make that, how dare you buy it ready-made? You should just buy the raw ingredients and cook it yourself!" (plus an additional metric half-ton of abuse, but I'll leave that out of things). Wound up getting four of whatever McCain's latest happy meal is and trying them.

* The new McCains steam meal Lean Cuisine things are okay, but the cooking instructions are a bit wonky for our microwave. The sauce container needs a minute less, the pasta/rice/vege container needs a minute more, and this seems to be pretty consistent across recipes.

* I have a heap of stuff for uni I'm supposed to have done already, and which I haven't done, and which I will be writing up pretty rapidly over the course of the next week or so (in order to have it done in time for the deadlines which are arriving in predictable fashion this month).

* The house looks like a hovel (okay, most of that is because it's a 1920s worker's cottage, and it hasn't had much serious maintenance since about the 1970s) mostly because I've been low on spoons and depressed.

* We've been dealing with a serious invasion of white cedar moth caterpillars (the side effects of having four Cape Lilac trees on the property), particularly in the room I'm using as my bedroom. One of the Cape Lilacs is about a metre away from the wall of my room, which means the underside of the house is the preferred daytime rest space for the caterpillars, and since this place is approximately as weather-tight as a sieve, they keep crawling into the house through gaps between the skirting board and the floorboards and similar. Plus there's the ones which crawl in from the front veranda under the front door (the door is poorly hung - it sticks at the top, while there's a gap below it the bugs can walk under on tiptoe), and the few which come in from the back garden and hit the rear hall and bathroom. So we've been spraying the house inside and out with surface spray (up under the weather-boards on the front of the house, down around the skirting boards in my room, across the threshold of the front door and so on) as well as doing a three-times daily "emu stalk" to collect up the caterpillars we find and dump them in a bucket, where I give 'em a dose of the poor man's pesticide (boiling water). One stalk in the morning, two at night (one just after dusk, one around 9.30pm, when I'm getting ready to go to bed). The numbers seem to be dropping - I didn't have any caterpillars in my room last night or this morning, so that's a good start. But it's another little aggravation in a series of them at a period where I could really do with a few less of same.

* I am learning some of the more irritating quirks of Windows 10 as an OS. Such as the apparent tendency for marketing to get in everywhere (why are there ads in the Windows Solitaire games, for gods sakes? Are they losing so much money on the OS that they can't afford to put them in there without ads any more?) and badger me about "whether I'd recommend this device to others?" and such.

* I've been binge-reading fanfic, to the point where I really need to start working on re-setting my sleep cycle so I'm not going to bed at ten and then reading until two in the morning.
megpie71: Cloud Strife says "Meep" (Excuse me sir)
Friday, April 21st, 2017 02:47 pm
Well, I have Orac back, with an OS reinstalled on him and all.

Problem is, while I asked for Windows 7 Home, what I got instead was Windows 10. Hoo-fscking-ray. So now I'm in the middle of reinstalling everything (at least I managed to get my Firefox bookmarks salvaged) and getting all my programs re-sorted and such. Have to re-download an email client (no, I don't want to be trying to use Outlook, thanks very much) as well as setting that up again.

All of this is complicated by the fact I've been suffering from the latest upper respiratory bastardry to be going through - it kicked in with a sore throat on Tuesday; I spent Wednesday being the snotmonster from forty thousand fathoms (or something close to it - going through an entire box of tissues in a single day is something of a nuisance); yesterday was spent in bed being feverish alternated with periods of attempting to cough up a lung; and today I've got the best bits of all three, plus sneezing. If you get a chance to pass on this thing, I'd strongly suggest doing so!

But at least I have Orac back, and I can download stuff and get things working and all the rest. It's better than nothing, even if I am going to probably spend the next few weeks re-installing things and doing the "download, install, restart, lather, rinse, repeat" polka. I'm looking forward to the fun of trying to get Steam to behave, since the re-install didn't wipe the existing partition with some of my Steam games in it, but did wipe out a lot of the others. So that's going to be more fun and games... quite literally. Plus, of course, I have my stuff that I'm supposed to be doing for uni (but which I've been disregarding due to lack of mental resource spoons - for some reason my brain does not wish to brain today).
megpie71: Slave computer, captioned "My most humble apologies, master" (computer troubles)
Wednesday, April 19th, 2017 11:06 am
(aka I love it when my life goes right... which may be why this happens so very rarely).

My main laptop, fondly nicknamed Orac, has decided today it has aspirations toward being a boat anchor. It starts booting Windows 7, gets as far as loading avgidsha.sys, and then just stops dead. I am currently writing this on my backup machine, Elfadunk, which is the little laptop which I bought for uni purposes - it's barely got the grunt to handle Chrome as a browser, and definitely isn't up to the sort of load I usually put on a main machine.

A bit of googling determines this is a known error (damnit) and the wretched thing is a problem with the intersection between AVG antivirus and Windows 7 (and higher, it appears). Given I've been using AVG for years without issue, I'm just a tad irritated. Steve's busy attempting to fix Orac now using a couple of fixes found via the interwebs, and we'll see whether we can get Orac to actually boot and work properly. If this doesn't work, I'm going to have to head out and clean out my bank account attempting to find myself another PC which will be a reasonable substitute.

Needless to say I'm just a little irritable about the whole mess. If nothing else, I'm going to have to try to re-create my entire bookmarks folder from Firefox via memory and guesswork (as well as trying to remember things like my actual ID for my.gov.au so I can report my employment income tomorrow... why do these things always happen at the most inconvenient time?). I swear, I get Orac booting again, and the first thing I'm going to be doing is transferring my bookmarks to a separate spreadsheet of their own, taking an HTML copy of the Firefox bookmarks file and stowing it on the terabyte drive, and keeping regular backups of same!

Grump!

(Updates as they occur. At present, we've managed to get Orac to "startup repair" mode, and we'll see whether this allows him to actually boot).

Update 11.54am: Steve's going to try making up a repair/reinstall disk to see whether we can get Orac to behave. Whatever happens, I'm going to be trying to find a different antivirus program. Any suggestions for free/cheap reputable antivirus gratefully accepted.

Update 1.22pm: Repair or reinstall disc failed. Called out Geek Mobile to get a backup, nuke and repave done on the OS. It's apparently going to cost me about $200, which seems a bit steep, but is about half the price of even the most basic new computer (well, aside from another Elfadunk equivalent). I have never been so glad I got into the awkward habit of keeping my files and documents stored on the terabyte backup drive, because at least I'm not going to lose any documents from this. Plus, of course, I keep the original download & install files for most of the software stored on the backup drive as well, so I can get the majority of my software reinstalled fairly easily. Still. Curse, swear, mumble.
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Monday, April 17th, 2017 10:58 am
Well, this is the final "what went right". It's been a fun four months, and I'll be sorry to see the series go in some ways, but unfortunately, go it must. So let's make this last one a good one.

Secret tomb containing bodies of former archbishops of Canterbury found under London museum by AP/ABC (uncredited)

The Garden Museum, located in the former St-Mary-at-Lambeth church, next to Lambeth Palace, has been closed for renovations since 2015. During the renovations, one of the things they discovered was a hidden crypt, containing the bodies of five former archbishops of Canterbury (Lambeth Palace is the Archbishop of Canterbury's London residence), among others. Given the former church's proximity to the Thames, the discovery of the crypt was a complete surprise.

Tasmanian mural competition challenges artists to look 'through the eyes of a child' by Sallese Gibson (ABC Tasmania)

Tasmania's MuralFest, hosted in the north-western Tasmanian town of Sheffield, kicked off on Sunday morning, with the theme of "Through the Eyes of a Child".

Giant pumpkins on show as locals compete at the Cadell Harvest Festival by Brittany Evins (ABC South Australia)

The annual Murray River Giant Pumpkin competition at the Cadell Harvest Festival has been held for the seventh time. It includes prizes for the ugliest pumpkin, the best dressed pumpkin, and the heaviest pumpkin.

So there's the final three for this series. It's been fun doing these, and I'm going to miss it, but unfortunately, I need the spoons it uses for other stuff. Thanks to everyone who's been reading along, and a big thanks to everyone who shared anything in the comments over the last four months. The good stuff is out there alongside the bad stuff - it's all a matter of where you direct your attention.
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Sunday, April 16th, 2017 09:31 am
Second last one of these, so let's see it's a good one. Here's three articles about "what went right" from my mainstream news feeds.

Developmental Coordination Disorder: Exercise help gets WA teenagers up and about by Tom Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

This article is a profile of the AMPitup program, run by the University of Notre Dame in Fremantle, for teenagers with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).

Texting bays offered to WA drivers tempted by mobile phones in bid to limit road toll by Sarah Whyte and AM Staff (AM, ABC Australia)

A trial of special texting bays, where drivers can pull over and check their mobile phones and respond to messages and such, is being undertaken on the Forrest and South-West Highways this year, to see whether this has any effect on the road toll during the school holidays. The trial runs until April 28 this year, and results will be reviewed by the WA Road Safety Commission.

Tasmanian recipes video offers new dietary ideas for chemotherapy patients by Harriet Aird (ABC Tasmania)

Lily Trewartha has survived Hodgkin's Lymphoma, and is putting her experiences with chemotherapy and her skills as a chef together in a video presentation for the Cancer Council. The presentation is aimed at helping chemotherapy patients maintain good nutrition, a healthy weight, and sufficient muscle mass to be able to handle higher doses of chemotherapy, and thus a shorter overall treatment time.

So there's my three for the day. If you've spotted any stories about "what went right" out there, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Saturday, April 15th, 2017 10:54 am
Third-last day of these. So here's three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Cape York town of Coen finally gets its own ambulance station amid rising visitor numbers by Kirsty Nancarrow (ABC Queensland)

Coen, 200km north of Cooktown on the Cape York peninsula, is a town of about 400 people, which sees about 1500 visitors during the dry season. Prior to now, it's been reliant on a bare-bones service consisting of a shed storing emergency equipment and a paramedic field officer; the nearest ambulance service would need to make a 10 hour round trip to get to Coen. The Queensland state government has committed funding for an ambulance station and extra staff during the busy dry season.

Placenta research could help doctors treat premature babies with chronic lung conditions by Katherine Gregory (ABC Victoria)

A study from Monash University and Monash Children's hospital offers the hope of better diagnosis, monitoring and treatment for the conditions bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) - conditions which can seriously affect babies born prematurely.

Shooters offer assistance to deal with growing feral deer problem around Canberra by Nick Haggarty (ABC Australian Capital Territory)

Feral deer are starting to become a problem for farmers and pastoralists around the Australian Capital Territory. However, the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia have offered to extend their Farmer Assist program to farmers in the region. The Farmer Assist program consists of farmers inviting qualified shooters onto their properties to deal with feral animals.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about what went right, why not share it in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Friday, April 14th, 2017 08:35 am
Happy Good Friday to any Christians reading. Today, for them, is the commemoration of the creation of the new covenant between God and humans, born out of tragedy as the first one had been. For the rest of us, it's a public holiday and an excuse for a long weekend. Either way, have three items from my news feeds about what went right.

Perth Zoo Easter egg hunt: Crickets, meerkat bedding among the mouth-watering treats by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

Animals at Perth Zoo continue to have seasonal enrichment activities - for easter, various animals will be getting treats inside paper mache eggs, to encourage them to forage for their food. A trial run was taken out among the zoo's meerkats, hyenas and sun bears earlier this week.

Embattled West Australian dairy farmers could make extra cash by breeding Wagyu beef by Tyne Logan

The head of the Australian Wagyu Association suggests that dairy farmers in WA who are having trouble getting milk supply contracts might want to consider breeding Wagyu/Freesian F1 cross cattle instead. These cattle fetch a high price at market.

Adelaide United players helping new arrivals from war-torn countries feel welcome by Sowaibah Hanifie (ABC South Australia)

A program run by the Uniting Church Wesley at Port Adelaide and Life Without Barriers is helping boys with their social, physical and mental wellbeing through playing soccer. Many of the boys are new arrivals to Australia from places like Afghanistan, Iran, Syria and various African nations.

So there's my three for the day. Enjoy your Easter weekend (where applicable), and if you find any links to stories about things going right, why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Thursday, April 13th, 2017 09:07 am
Well, we're well into the final week of this project - as previously mentioned, it winds up on 17 April - so let's get on with the three stories about what went right" from my newsfeed for today.

Indigenous influence on AFL creation confirmed by historical transcripts, historian says by Malcolm Sutton (ABC Victoria)

Professor Jenny Hocking, a historian with Monash University, has found transcripts which point to an indigenous origin for the Australian Rules football code - most specifically, a game now referred to as Marngrook.

Researcher hopes to use brain's natural response to music to aid stroke recovery by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A researcher at Murdoch University is looking to recruit "stroke patients to participate in a study of a music-based, individualised therapy program using smartphone app GotRhythm, which was developed by exercise scientists at the University of Western Australia."

Open-air dinosaur museum opens in outback Queensland, 100 million years in the making by Nicole Bond (ABC Western Queensland)

A new permanent open-air exhibition has been added to the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum at Winton, Queensland.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about what went right, why not share them in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Wednesday, April 12th, 2017 10:38 am
So, back on track again, pretty much recovered from whatever the lurgi was, and caught up on my sleep. Here's three things about "what went right" from my mainstream media feeds.

The Warriors: Kimberley teen Gordon Churchill scores leading role in upcoming TV series by Kelly Williams (Back Roads, ABC Australia)

A profile of Gordon Churchill, one of the lead actors in upcoming TV series "The Warriors".

Seven small West Australian citrus farms join together to gain entry to export markets by Bridget Fitzgerald (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

A group of seven citrus farms based around Gingin in Western Australia have joined together as a co-operative (Western Citrus Alliance) in order to be able to more readily access export markets.

Artificial insemination program successfully produces Black Angus calves by Lucinda Jose (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

Tony Sudlow's Angus stud has produced seventy-five new Black Angus calves so far this year, with the males being destined to be sold as stud bulls, while half the females will also be sold to breeders.

So there's my three for the day. If you've seen any stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 10:35 am
Today's excuse for why this is late is a simple one: it's a non-teaching week at uni, and I decided to sleep in. I'm running late overall. Apologies for the delay. Here's three items about "what went right" from my news feeds anyway.

Perth Swans netball team shoots for gold at Australian Sikh Games by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

The Australian Sikh games are happening in Adelaide this year, and the Perth Sikh Swans are hoping to bring back gold in the Junior Girls Netball competition.

Western Australian farming community comes together for annual shear for breast cancer by Tyne Logan (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

The annual Yorkraine "Shear for Liz" event went off without a hitch this year, despite a freak storm ripping the roof off the shearing shed where it's usually held. The event is held in memoriam for Liz Roberts, who died of breast cancer in 2014, and consists of shearers donating a day's wages from shearing toward breast cancer research. This year, they raised over $20,000.

Rare tropical ribboned seadragon bred in Geraldton gives students unique access by Christopher Lewis (ABC Mid West and Wheatbelt, Western Australia)

A chance event has resulted in the Batavia Coast Maritime Institute becoming the host to a large colony of ribboned sea dragons (about 170 babies, and two adults). The Institute's staff and students are looking on it as a phenomenal learning opportunity.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about what went right in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Monday, April 10th, 2017 10:06 am
Sorry this is late again today - I'm still down with whichever lurgi was making my life a misery yesterday, so I've been spending a lot of time sleeping. Hopefully I'll be back to what passes for normal by tomorrow. In the meantime, have three articles about what went right from my news feeds.

Shalom House says hardline approach at Australia's 'strictest' drug rehab centre delivers results by Caitlin Shea (Australian Story, ABC Australia)

A profile of the Shalom House rehabilitation centre, near Perth. The centre runs a very tough program, which isn't government-sponsored, and which centres on getting the residents detoxed, working in the community and then working in paid employment. Residents are expected to pay for their own rehabilitation.

Art on Prescription helps Iraqi refugees begin recovery from trauma, anxiety and depression by Amanda Hoh (ABC Radio Sydney, New South Wales)

A profile of the Arts on Prescription program being run by the Hammond Care aged care facility at the Liverpool Migrant Resource Centre in Sydney.

Melbourne's Burke and Wills statue removed from display to make way for Metro Rail by James Hancock (ABC Victoria)

The statue of Burke and Wills which was at the corner of Collins and Swanston streets in Melbourne has been moved to make way for construction work on the Metro Rail project. This is the fifth time the monument has been relocated since it was presented to the City by sculptor Charles Summers in 1865.

So there's my three stories about "what went right". If you've found a story about what went right in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Sunday, April 9th, 2017 01:47 pm
Sorry this is so late today - my body decided to object strenuously to last night's dinner, and I've been dealing with that. So, three things from my news feeds about what went right.

Surfing as therapy for autism: Ocean Heroes charity helps children find connection by Eliza Laschon

A short profile of the Ocean Heroes charity, and their work with kids with autism.

Basque separatists give up weapons in 'historic' peace move by AP (uncredited)

The Basque separatist group, ETA, has revealled the locations of eight caches of weapons, through the mediation group "Peace Artisans". This is the second-to-last step of a process of of peace creation in the Basque region demanded jointly by France and Spain.

Minecraft morphed into game to help kids and parents deal with onset of diabetes by Nick Wiggins (ABC Queensland)

Josh Wulf has adapted the popular game "Minecraft" to help kids who have been newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes learn the rituals of monitoring their glucose and insulin levels.

So there's my three for the day. Again, sorry about the delay.
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Boing)
Saturday, April 8th, 2017 09:51 am
Running a bit late this morning - I got caught up in doing some creative work (first time in ages I've been even vaguely inspired, so I wanted to get as much as possible down before it all ran off). Sorry about the delay, but here's the three items about what went right from my news feeds.

How to read a dress: Ways women's clothes tell the story of Western societies through the ages by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A brief profile of the work of Perth academic Lydia Edwards, and her new book "How To Read A Dress".

Country football code sets standards on employment, domestic violence and children's education by Vanessa Mills and Ben Collins (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

The East Kimberley Football League is attempting to use participation in AFL football clubs as a way of leveraging participation in social change in remote communities through their new code of conduct. There are standards around participation in employment or looking for work, avoidance of domestic violence, and attempting to get and keep kids in school which potential players are being asked to meet.

Early onset dementia could be a life sentence, but for Andy Creighan it came as a relief by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

A profile of Andy Creighan, who was diagnosed with early onset dementia at age 54, but still manages to have a full and busy life despite the inevitable cognitive difficulties.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about what went right in your news feed, why not share it in the comments and boost the signal?
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Friday, April 7th, 2017 09:10 am
Only another ten days of this project left - it finishes on 17 April this year. But while it lasts, I'll still be putting up three links per day to stories about "what went right" from my news feeds. Here's today's:

First ocean-grown abalone farm for Esperance expected to be up and running by end of year by Tara de Landgraaft (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

"Proponents behind the Esperance region's first ocean-grown abalone enterprise hope to be up and running by the end of the year."

Space Gandalf: Who is Greg Quicke — the man behind the beard — and where did he come from? by Gemma Deavin and Jennifer King (ABC Western Plains, ABC New South Wales)

A profile of Greg Quicke, one of the rising stars of the ABC's "Stargazing Live" program.

The WA youth camp transforming teens' lives by Lisa Morrison, Andrew Collins and Bridget Fitzgerald (ABC Great Southern, ABC Western Australia)

Tanya Dupagne, the founder of Camp Kulin, has been awarded the WA Rural Woman of the Year Award.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your newsfeed, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Yay)
Thursday, April 6th, 2017 09:17 am
The weather today is grey and foggy (winter is coming... eventually). Have three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds to help perk up a grey day.

Students building and racing solar-powered miniature cars to get enthused about STEM by Sarah Collard (ABC Western Australia)

The Science Teachers Association of Western Australia (STAWA) and Synergy have teamed up with around 60 schools from around Western Australia to teach students about science, mathematics, engineering, and technology through the medium of building and racing miniature solar-powered cars.

Cutting-edge conservation: Using drones to monitor ecological restoration in the Gondwana Link by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

The Gondwana Link bush corridor project aims to reconnect areas between Margaret River and the Nullarbor Plain by providing a corridor of reclaimed agricultural land where native plants and animals can flourish. Bush Heritage Australia, the group which is administering the project, are excited by the potential of using flying drones to assist in tasks such as monitoring the extent of vegetation, determining the fire history of an area, and possibly even monitoring for wildlife presence.

Older workers happiest at work and money less important, Australian study finds by Matthew Bamford (ABC Australia)

Researchers from Curtin University have completed a study of over 17,000 workers across Australia, trying to determine the keys to job satisfaction, and are reporting older workers (particularly those over 70) tend to be happier in work than younger ones, workers who are happier with their jobs report taking home lower wages than those who aren't as happy, and that Tasmania leads the country in several key job satisfaction indicators.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about what went right in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 09:46 am
Another day, another three things from my news feeds about what went right.

Surfers train to save lives at WA beaches when life savers not on duty by Nicolas Perpitch (ABC Western Australia)

Surfers tend to be at more beaches than surf life savers, and they're generally there for longer than the surf life savers can manage as well. So Surfing WA and Surf Life Saving WA have joined forces with a free program to give surfers enough first aid knowledge to be useful in a crisis.

Meet Mia Davies, Australia's first female Nationals leader by Eliza Borello (AM, ABC Western Australia)

A profile of Mia Davies, the leader of the WA Nationals (which are now unique for two factors - firstly, their lack of a coalition with the Liberals, and now, their election of a female leader).

Latest Helicobacter pylori breakthrough could lead to eradication of bacteria by Tom Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

A team of researchers led by Professor Barry Marshall (who was the joint winner of the Nobel in 2005 for the discovery of helicobacter pylori) is conducting further study on the bacteria, with the overall aim of being able to find methods of treating h.pylori infection.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story in your news feeds about what went right, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal?
megpie71: Storyboard Zack Fair is happy - smiling, moving up and to the right. (Yay)
Tuesday, April 4th, 2017 07:34 am
As previously stated, this series is going to be winding up in just under 2 weeks (17 April). So, I'm making the most of the last few days of the process. Here's today's selection of stories from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Culture key to suicide prevention among Indigenous Australians, experts say, ahead of global discussion by Andie Noonan (ABC Victoria)

This isn't so much a "what went right" as "what's got the potential to go right". Australia's indigenous suicide rate is very high - indigenous Australians are up to five times more likely to take their own lives than non-indigenous. There are hopes that experts from other countries with colonised indigenous populations, such as New Zealand and Canada, can offer techniques and perspectives for suicide prevention which may prove successful, but in the meantime, one thing which is working here in Australia is forging stronger connections with Indigenous cultures and with the land, as a tool for hope.

Australia's numbat population boosted after successful breeding in WA by Sarah Tallier (ABC Mid West and Wheatbelt, Western Australia)

Numbats from two zoos which were transported to Mount Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary (a zone fenced off to exclude feral predators) appear to have settled in well, and are breeding.

Sydney's Addison Hotel opens its doors to homeless youth in Australian first by Paige Cockburn

The Addison Hotel in Kensington, Sydney, was sitting idle while a development plan waits on approval. Rather than waste the opportunity, the building's owner has offered the space to accommodate homeless youth - 42 fully-furnished rooms, each with their own bathroom and kitchenette.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal.
megpie71: Simplified Bishie Sephiroth says "Neat!" (Enthuse)
Monday, April 3rd, 2017 07:38 am
Well, I've only fourteen more of these to go - better make 'em good! So here's three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Dementia patients using robots, virtual reality to engage by Rebecca Turner (ABC Western Australia)

Contains video footage. People in dementia care in a number of facilities in Perth are receiving assistance from technological measures to help them feel more comfortable with interacting. These includes things like humanoid robots, virtual reality goggles, and virtual walls.

Remote WA communities cut off by flooding for months by Erin Parke (ABC Western Australia)

While there's concern about towns in New South Wales and Queensland which have been recently inundated by flood-waters, spare a thought for the folks in remote communities in WA's Kimberley, who have been largely isolated for about three months as a result of the big "wet" this year. While it's an expected part of the seasonal flow up there (so people start stockpiling food and fuel from about October and November onward) it's been a bit more intense than expected this year, so folks are giving a sigh of relief as the dirt roads start to dry out and become accessible again.

Albany-based whisky distillery gears up for national competition with 'millennia-old' local peat by Sean Murphy (Landline, ABC Western Australia)

A peat bog which was a liability for prime lamb and marron producer Richard Hughes is now "black gold" - a key ingredient in the Great Southern Distillery's prize-winning Limeburners single malt whisky.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right", why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?