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megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
megpie71

August 2015

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megpie71: Animated: "Are you going to come quietly/Or do I have to use earplugs?" (Goons)
Sunday, August 2nd, 2015 09:59 am
Apparently-From: Allen Larged (test@aachen-upvc.com)
Subject: [Bulk] Your Abandoned Package For Delivery
Reply-To: allenlarged@qq.com
Addressed To: unknown

Scam text below )

Okay, first and most obvious scam flag flying here: you're being asked to partake in a crime (namely, theft). You're stealing not only from this anonymous diplomat, but also the US Treasury (who do tend to be a tad tetchy and unreasonable about such things), and probably also from the citizens of the country the diplomat hailed from. A complete stranger who asks you to participate in a crime on first introduction does not necessarily have your best interests at heart.

Of course, this is assuming the box and/or the money exist in the first place, which, of course, they don't. If you google on the search string "abandoned package scam" you'll find lots of copies of the above email, listing just about every airport in the USA.

Even if the box did exist, I'd be strongly advising you to first check the contents. It will do you absolutely no good at all to pay $3700 USD to receive a 110kg box of shredded paper. Or a box full of a currency which is defunct (such as Zimbabwean dollars - the Zimbabwean government phased out their currency starting in 2009 - they're currently buying back the currency until 30 September this year) or practically worthless (Iranian rials, Vietnamese dong, etc).

Basically, this is a variation on the good old "advanced fee fraud" or "Spanish prisoner" trick. As the Spanish Prisoner, this con has been around since the sixteenth century, so it certainly has legs. It's based on essentially getting someone to pay serious money today in the hope of reward tomorrow.

As always, the main thing you need to beat the scammer is a sense of proportion and hubris - in this case, why would some diplomat from who-knows-where in Africa have MY name as the consignee for a box full of money? Other questions you might want to ask include: if this thing had my details as a consignee, why has it been sitting around in a warehouse in $US_STATE for ages, apparently abandoned? Why wasn't it just forwarded on to me directly on a cash-on-delivery basis? Surely the airport actually needs the space a 110kg package would be occupying. How does this person know the box contains money? (did they already open it? If so, why shouldn't I presume they helped themselves to their 30% share of the proceeds straight up?). This story has plot holes galore - going through and spotting them is a good education in the process of narrative creation.

Either way, it's a scam. Don't contact the person back, don't send them your details, and for heaven's sake, don't send them any money.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra glares and says "The Look says it all" (glare)
Friday, July 24th, 2015 09:52 am
Apparently-From: Secret Shopper[unknown unicode character] (spamfilter@weather3000.com)
Subject: [Bulk] **JOB APPLICATION: BECOME A MYSTERY SHOPPER®2015**
Reply-to: tyliebmann@gmail.com
Addressed To: [blank]

Scam body below )

This one actually overlaps both categories of scam I've been alerting people about - it's a bogus "employment" offer, and a cover for an attempt at advance fee fraud. So, time to see which scam flags it's flying.

1) Contact offering unskilled "employment" out of nowhere, completely unsolicited. As I've said repeatedly in the employment scam posts in the past, in a declining economy (which is what most Western countries are experiencing at present) where unemployment is high, employers do not have to solicit candidates for unskilled roles - they're more likely to be turning them away in droves. Therefore anyone offering you one of those out of the blue in these circumstances is, at the very least, highly dodgy.

2) Offer of an immediate start with no interview. Most legitimate employers will at least want to meet up with you in person before they offer you the contract, because they're looking to keep you on for at least the short term, and they need you to be able to work with the rest of their team.

3) Apparently corporate personage emailing you with a gmail throw-away reply-to address. This is dodgy as well - if this person is working for a company, why aren't they emailing us from their corporate address and getting us to send our replies to that corporate address? The address at weather3000.com is owned by the Aerospace & Marine International Corporation, based in California, which you'll note isn't mentioned anywhere in the text of the email. Either they've hijacked the email server to send from, or we're looking at someone trying to set up a scam using their employer's resources... no matter which way you slice it, this doesn't send positive messages about their trustworthiness.

4) Googling the search string "MH Recruitment secret shopper" gives you a page of warnings about this being a scam. This is usually a pretty big hint.

As always, best policy is to delete these without replying to them.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "Heee!" (Ha ha only serious)
Saturday, July 18th, 2015 08:55 am
Apparently-From: Mr Warren Buffett (dschrum@embarqmail.com)
Subject: [Bulk] DONATION FOR YOU!!!!
Reply-To: warrenbuffett008@gmail.com
Addressed To: [Blank]

Scam body under the fold )

I think this one wins points for chutzpah. The article linked in the scam is actually genuine, and talks about how Warren Buffett and a number of other very rich investors do actually give a lot of money away to charity (Warren Buffett being among the rare breed of billionaires who apparently feels he has enough money now, thank you). So that's the one thing in the whole darn rigmarole which is actually accurate.

The rest is bullshit. There is no $5 million US waiting for you. If you spend approximately 10 seconds googling Warren Buffett and reading up his wikipedia article, you will discover the money he is giving away is mostly being distributed via the Gates Foundation - not through random emails to random schlubs on the internet. Oh, and as at 2013, he'd sent approximately one email in his life. Unless he's really caught on fast, I doubt he's the one behind these particular letters.

(If he was, he's of the generation which would consider it only polite to send a letter which was correctly punctuated, grammatically accurate, and proofread.)

I rather doubt someone like Warren Buffett would be using a gmail throw-away address, either. He's much more likely to be using a corporate address through his company, Bershire Hathaway.

So, 10 points to the scammer for trying, minus several million (let's say 5 million, shall we?) for actual effect.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra glares and says "The Look says it all" (glare)
Saturday, July 18th, 2015 08:29 am
Apparently-From: Kerry Lambert (jpui616@gmail.com)
Subject: [Bulk] Overseas Credit Commission (OCC) - Brussels
Reply-To: overseascreditcomm@yahoo.be
Addressed to: Recipients (jpui616@gmail.com)

Scam body under fold )

I'm not going to bother listing the scam flags for this one - they should be clear enough by now. If you want to learn more about this particular scam, check out http://www.419scam.org/emails/2010-10/28/00042205.2.htm. They've written up a copy from 2010.

Yes, scams get recycled.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra glares and says "The Look says it all" (glare)
Friday, July 17th, 2015 07:03 am
Apparently-from: Foreign Operations (operationsforeign044@gmail.com)
Subject: [Bulk] HELLO
Reply-to: operationsforeign001@gmail.com
To: (left blank)

Read more... )

As always, they're trying to hook you through your greed, and your apparent willingness to do something unethical (claim unclaimed funds you probably don't have a right to). This last is actually a pretty clear marker for scams - if someone you've never come across before is trying to make you do something which isn't morally or ethically right, they probably don't have your best interests at heart.

(There's also the consideration that if you've never done anything criminal before, the people who are trying to lure you into trying to flim-flam them are almost certainly more experienced in the matter than you are, and better able to spot what you're doing. For them it's the equivalent of watching a toddler trying to catch a seagull).

Scam flags:

1) Why is the International Monetary Fund contacting a suburban housewife in Western Australia offering an unclaimed fund of $5 million US dollars?

2) Why is a big organisation like the International Monetary Fund sending out emails from a gmail.com throw-away address?

3) Why, if they're contacting me to give this money away, do they need me to supply all these identification details?

4) Why, if they have $5 million to give away, aren't they willing to spend a few hundred of it on a decent proof reader and secretarial services?

Don't reply, don't give your details, and don't believe in the money. It doesn't exist.
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
Friday, July 17th, 2015 06:45 am
Apparently-From: UNITED NATIONS (united59@hotmail.com)
Subject: [Bulk] RE: PAYMENT UPDATE 2015
Reply-to: weathersbypbank@gmail.com
Addressed to: unknown, probably not just me.

Scam body under fold )

As always, these things use your greed to try and hook you. After all, there's a fun of $8.3 million at stake here... or rather, there isn't. There is, however, a wonderful opportunity to clean out your own bank accounts attempting to get hold of it.

So, scam flags flying:

1) Appears out of the blue, and implies it's the final piece of a long chain of correspondence which has just mysteriously gone astray and landed in my inbox. No addressee details, no information about who the mail is addressed to. So there's the implication that if you accept their offer and reply to the mail, you're defrauding them. Remember the old grifter adage: "You can't bilk an honest man", and avoid anything which starts out by attempting to lure you into unethical behaviour.

2) Demanding details from me (details which can be used to steal my identity, or to add my name, address, email number, phone number, fax and mobile details to a sucker list and set me up for further scams).

3) Apparently large organisations (the United Nations, a private bank in the UK) using hotmail.com and gmail.com throw-away addresses as contacts rather than their own private domains.

4) This one is incredibly cagey about what the money is intended to be - is it a contract payment, an award for damages, a prize in a lottery, or what? (Well, it doesn't really matter, since the money doesn't exist in the first place).

As always, delete and don't reply. If you have replied... well, at the very least you're probably added to someone's "sucker list", and you're going to see a lot more of these. Have a word with your bank and get them to lock down your bank account for a bit, so no unauthorised transactions go through, and see about getting your phone and mobile numbers put on a do-not-call list.
megpie71: Photo of sign reading "Those who throw objects at the crocodiles will be asked to retrieve them." (Go Fetch)
Wednesday, July 15th, 2015 07:30 am
Apparently-From: Dr David Cole (info@aee.gov.ly)
Subject: [Bulk] REPLY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
Reply-To: dr.cole000@gmail.com
Addressed to: undisclosed-recipients:;

Scam body below )

Okay, so for a half share in 36.5 million US dollars, I'm expected to get into contact with Dr David Cole, and help him defraud his employer. If your scam alarm isn't going off loudly enough to deafen you on hearing something like that, you're probably precisely the sort of person this scammer is looking for!

Scam flags flying:

1) Contact out of the blue from someone I don't know who expects me to do something unlikely. I've never heard of Dr Cole before (so why should I trust him?), and more importantly, out of over seven billion people in the world, why on earth would he pick me, a suburban housewife in Western Australia, who he has never met before and knows nothing about, in order to help him with a criminal enterprise which requires him to trust me utterly?

2) Yes, this would be a criminal enterprise if it were real. You'd be planning to defraud a bank (Barclays Bank PLC), the government of the United Kingdom (where Barclays Bank is based), and the actual relatives of William A Carpenter. Nice people don't ask casual acquaintances to participate in major fraud as their first action.

3) The manner and place of your death does not determine whether or not you died intestate - what determines whether you died intestate is whether or not you have a known and valid will (as in "last will and testament") at the time of your death.

From this point, if their mark bites, the scam can go in any number of directions, depending on what the scammer is chasing. If they're after money, they'll start in on either advanced fee fraud by asking you to supply funds toward administrative costs, bribes and so on; or alternatively they can just go for straight blackmail - by responding, you're agreeing to participate in a fraud, after all (and this opens you up to the prospect of imprisonment), and presumably you'll pay money to stay out of prison. If they're after identity details, they'll ask for things like bank account numbers and other identifying information, so they can steal your identity (and probably all the cash from your bank account while they're at it).

As always, the trick to avoiding these is fairly straightforward: keep a sense of perspective, and don't be blinded by greed. If something seems too good to be true, it usually is. As a common-sense rule, someone planning a complicated fraud will tend to stick with people they know and can trust not to hand them over to the police (for whatever reason). They're not going to pick complete strangers at random, not knowing the first thing about their ethics.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "The stupid, it hurts". (stupid hurts)
Tuesday, July 14th, 2015 07:05 am
Apparently-From: anabon@huincacoop.com.ar
Subject: Attention: E-mail User
Reply-To: no-reply@accounts.upgrade.com
Addressed to Me: Possibly ("To:" is "undisclosed-recipients:;")

Scam content under fold )

I'm not sure what the heck is up with this one. I suspect the idea is you go to the address listed, and immediately start getting targeted by loads of viruses, or by demands for money to "upgrade" your account. Since I don't have an account with moonfruit.com, and I certainly don't have an email account with any of the other domains listed, I haven't gone to look at it.

Mind you, a bit of fast googling shows Moonfruit is basically a free website vendor based in the UK, which has its own "build-your-own-website" service. So I suspect what we're looking at here is someone using a free web service in an effort to either run a scam, or spread a virus or target machines for a botnet or whatever.

If you've got one of these (and this one showed up in my actual inbox, rather than being bounced into the bulk mail section) it's probably best to ignore it. While I'm not sure what kind of scam the sender may be running (and I don't particularly care to find out) anything which comes out of the blue like this from someone I've never heard of isn't to be trusted anyway.

(I tend to collect most of my email via POP, which means I download it onto my computer at home and remove it from the account provider's server, so I know my main email account is highly unlikely to be running out of quota.)
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "The stupid, it hurts". (stupid hurts)
Tuesday, July 14th, 2015 06:40 am
Apparently-From: M.H. (wepsprex@tin.it)
Subject: [Bulk] RE : Very Important Information
Reply-To: yminghua76@gmail.com
Addressed to Me: yes

Scam content under fold )

I'm listing this one as a potential scam because of the lack of details in there, and because it's appearing out of the blue. Essentially, this one is chumming the waters, fishing for email addresses where someone is "listening" and hopefully curious about the proposal being hinted at. If you reply, your email address is going to be sold on as a "valid" email address, or even better still, as an email address where this sort of thing is read, believed, and followed up on. (Congratulations! You will have just gained the reputation of being a good target for scammers.)

Me, I'm mostly curious why the Business Relationship Manager for the Bank of China in Hong Kong's investments unit would be contacting a suburban housewife in Australia via bulk email, and why the return address I'm supposed to reply to them at is a gmail throw-away address. But I can live without those particular curiosities being satisfied. I suspect the prospect involved would be one of those intriguing offers to have my bank account hoovered out, to do work laundering money for criminal interests, or have my identity stolen, and I'm not overly interested in any of those options. As always, the best tools for resisting scammers are a sense of perspective (an awareness of your place in the scheme of things - why would they be contacting me about this rather than someone else?) and a sceptical mindset.
megpie71: Impossibility established early takes the sting out of the rest of the obstacles (Impossibility)
Sunday, July 12th, 2015 08:33 am
Apparently-From: player@national-lottery.co.uk (een27@nuk6.onmicrosoft.com)
Subject Line: [Bulk] National Lottery Winner!
Reply-To: mwaet@e-mail.ua
Addressed to me: No.

Scam text under fold )

I've apparently won the UK National Lottery! This is something of a surprise to me, particularly since I've never purchased a ticket in same. Scam flag number one.

A quick google on the UK National Lottery reveals another interesting piece of information - their registered office is "Camelot UK Lotteries Limited, Registered office: Tolpits Lane, Watford, Herts WD18 9RN". Not Liverpool as listed above. Their contact addresses are listed (on their "contact us" page) as:


For general enquiries, write to us at:

The National Lottery
PO Box 251
Watford
WD18 9BR

For questions about lost, stolen or destroyed tickets or a prize payout, write to us at:

The National Lottery
PO Box 287
Watford
WD18 9TT


Scam flag two.

Another quick gander at the National Lottery site Service Guide reveals the following information:

Can I play from overseas?

No, you must be physically located in the UK or Isle of Man when buying a National Lottery game online or when setting up or amending a Direct Debit (including adding or deleting play slips and changing your payment details).


Scam flag three.

Oh, and I'm being told my email was specially selected for this prize, but the email I received about it wasn't addressed to me in the first place. Scam flag four.

So, looks like I haven't won the lottery after all. So, off that one goes into the bit bucket.

My advice to everyone getting these sorts of things: remember, the cardinal rule with any sort of lottery is you have to have a ticket to be eligible to win. If you don't remember buying a ticket, and you don't have a ticket actually in your possession, you almost certainly haven't won a prize.
megpie71: 9th Doctor resting head against TARDIS with repeated *thunk* text (Head!Tardis)
Saturday, July 11th, 2015 09:20 am
Apparently-From: MR. Paresh Khiara (Khiara@telenor.dk)
Subject Line: [Bulk] Project Loans - Etihad Capital
Reply-To: etihadcapitalop@yahoo.de
Addressed to me: Yes

Scam body below the fold )

This is a sneaky one. A bit of googling shows the firm, Etihad Capital, actually exists - it's apparently a small investment banking firm based in Abu Dhabi. The person apparently writing to you, Paresh Khiara, actually exists.

Here's where it starts getting dodgy: unless Mr Khiara hasn't updated his LinkedIn profile recently, Paresh Khiara doesn't work for Etihad Capital. LinkedIn has him working at Al Mal Capital.

So while the person and the firm both exist, it doesn't seem likely they're both joined at present. This is not only a major scam flag, but also a major fraud flag as well - looks like there's a touch of identity theft happening here as well.

Other scam flags:

* The mail and the people involved say they're being sent from Abu Dhabi. The email addresses, meanwhile, are apparently in Denmark (telenor.dk), Germany (yahoo.de), and the USA (hotmail.com). The two reply email addresses are both throw-away free-mail addresses. If this is being sent from a company based in the UAE, why isn't it using their corporate domain, etihadcapital.com?

* This is clearly a "fishing" letter - it's asking "do you have any projects you want funded?" of just about anyone (after all, I'm not looking for finance for any projects myself, nor have I been in the past few months, or even the past few years). They're either looking for clients (if it actually was a legitimate business) or suckers (which is much more likely).

* They're also asking "do you fancy yourself as a broker for our business?" - which seems an even more dodgy question to be asking of people picked at random off the internet.

* A minor sign, but a significant one - they're purportedly working for a major investment bank, but they can't afford paragraph breaks? Yeah, right.

As always, the best place for all of these is the bit-bucket. Don't reply, even to tell them to take you off their list. If you think Etihad Capital, or Paresh Khiara might be the right people for you to work with, contact them via their LinkedIn pages or in the case of Etihad Capital, their main website. Don't use any of the details from the email to try and get into contact with them.


Footnote: there's some indicators in the text and the labelling of the apparently-from address that make me think there's a certain amount of "sovereign citizen" nonsense involved, too - the specification of and emphasis on the personal pronoun and the punctuation looks a lot like the sort of nonsense people caught up in the "sovereign citizen" scams in the USA use to try and render themselves less liable for their bills and actions. Here's a hint: it doesn't work in the USA, and it probably won't work in whichever country this scammer is sending from either.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra glares and says "The Look says it all" (glare)
Thursday, July 9th, 2015 07:28 am
So I've decided to broaden my horizons a bit by dealing with the other popular type of scam landing in my email box - the "advance fee fraud". These are the ones which involve you being promised this huge sum of money (because Reasons), but if you reply to the email, you'll be asked to forward a bit of money yourself (maybe about $1000) to cover "administration costs" or "access fees" or whatever.

These frauds hope to hook you in using your greed, waving the large sum of money you could get tomorrow under your nose, and making you blind to the amount of money you'll wind up paying out today. The simplest way to deal with them is not to reply to them.

So, with that out of the way, let's look at the actual scam. I'll be putting these under a cut, because they tend to be long-winded. I've added in some comments - the original scam is in italics, while my stuff is in plain text.

Scam below )

As always, the safest thing to do with these sorts of things is delete them on sight.
megpie71: 9th Doctor resting head against TARDIS with repeated *thunk* text (Head!Tardis)
Wednesday, July 1st, 2015 06:48 am
New one from the email box, fresh this morning.

Apparently-From: Huamao (huamaocorpo@gmail.com)
Subject: [Bulk] Get Back To Me ASAP
Reply-To: huamaocorps@gmail.com

Sir/Madam,


I am Mr. Chung Botero, Chief Operating Officer and President of Sales & Marketing.
Huamao Corporation which was founded in 1981.

Huamao Corporation is one of China's largest enterprise groups of consumer
electronics on global scale, with major consumer products including Color TV, mobile
Phone, Air Conditioners, Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Small Appliances. Currently,

HUAMAO CORPORATION has five industry groups of Huamao Corporation
Multimedia, Communications, CSOT, Huamao Corporation Home Appliance and
Tonly Electronics, as well as System Technology Business Division, Techne Group,
Emerging Business Group, Investment Group, Highly Information Industry.

This Company is seeking for the services of an Experienced person for position of
a Payment Collectors/International company representative in U.S.A and CANADA.

If you are interested for this position please contact the company Chief Operating Officer.
We await your response.

Regards,
Mr. Chung Botero
Chief Operating Officer
Email: huamaocorps@gmail.com
Huamao Corporation
Address:22/F,TCL Technology Building,
17 Huifeng 3rd Road,
Zhongkai Hi-tech Development District,
Huizhou,Guangdong,516006P.R.China P.C.:516001
http://www.huamao.com.cn/


So, scam flags flying here:

1) Unsolicited offer of work - as I've stated repeatedly before, in declining economies (which label fits the majority of Western economies right now) an employer will not need to solicit random strangers on the internet to find employees. Posting an ad on a job board will get you candidates galore.

2) They're looking for people in the USA and Canada - so why have they sent one to me in Australia? (It can't be because they don't know I'm in Australia - my email address is in a .com.au domain).

3) Googling "Huamao Corporation" brings up a lot of listings for "Huamao Group", but the only reference to "Huamao Corporation" on the first page is "JOB OFFER - 419 SCAM". So not only have they done this before, they've been spotted before. Looking at the linked page, it appears whoever is running this scam is using the same text as previously, but a different email address.

(A 419 scam is "advanced fee fraud" - the sort of scam where the scammer promises you a huge reward, but you have to send them some money first, to cover administrative costs, you understand... you'll get the money tomorrow, really. But tomorrow, there's more admin costs to be covered, and you'll need to send them more cash to cover those in order to get your big payout, and so on and so on.)

4) The email address the letter is apparently sent from is different to the email address you reply to - but the difference is very subtle (one letter difference). Both email addresses are free email accounts through gmail.com, which is NOT how major corporations do things - a corporation buys a domain, sets up a mail server and sends things from their own email domain.

5) No details of the job itself - it's all about the company. They don't let you know what skills they want, or how much they're going to be paying, or even which currency you're going to be paid in.

As always, the drill is: don't reply, don't give them any information, and don't, whatever you do, take the offer seriously.
megpie71: Simplified bishie Rufus Shinra says "The stupid, it hurts". (Rufus2)
Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015 06:52 pm
'Urgent' need for another public secondary school in Perth's western suburbs, Education Minister says

Back in 1999 - 2000, the state government of Western Australia, led by Richard Court (Liberal) closed three public high schools in Perth's Western Suburbs, citing lack of enrolments and lack of demand for the facilities. In 1999, Scarborough Senior High School closed down, and in 2000 Swanbourne Senior High School and Hollywood Senior High School (in Nedlands) were closed down and their student bodies merged into Shenton College. The land they stood on was sold off to developers, who later sold it on at a profit as premium housing in the prestigious Western suburbs.

The education minister at the time was one Colin Barnett.

Now, eleven years later, there's apparently urgent need for at least one more state high school in Perth's western suburbs, because the two state-run facilities which remain, Churchlands Senior High School (in Churchlands) and Shenton College (near Subiaco) are bulging at the seams and running out of facilities for students. There's going to be a need for another 1,417 spaces by 2020. The current (Liberal) state government, under Premier Colin Barnett, appears somewhat surprised by this.

Kids grow up, who knew?

Unfortunately, the cost of land in the Western suburbs is sky-high (which is why all those high schools were closed in the first place - where else was the government going to find prime real estate for the developers to sell off?). The government is looking at space in City Beach (and probably wincing, shuddering and bleeding when they consider the cost, given land prices in the area), but they're constrained by the fact that at the end of the mining boom, the coffers are suddenly empty. All the money's been spent. Including, one must add, all the money they earned from selling off those school sites in the first place.

See, the thing about schools is this: demand for school places in a particular region is cyclical. You'll get times when you have a high population of students, because your suburbs are full of young families settling in with their kids, and needing things like primary and secondary schools, sporting grounds and so on. That'll last for maybe a couple of decades, and then there'll be a bit of a gap, where the demand dries up a bit, because all those kids you put through the school system have grown up and are getting started on their own lives, and moving away from their parents' homes. But if you hang about for a bit (maybe about a decade or two), you'll find that once again, you're going to need those school facilities, because the original parents will be selling up and downsizing, selling their family houses to young families who want to buy in the area because of things like access to schools! Bingo! You have a new generation coming up who want things like schooling.

A school building is a long-term investment, something you build for three or four generations, not just one. They're specialist assets to the region, which attract people to suburbs, rather than simply being drains on the public purse. Even if the demand for the school is low at present, it will increase in ten to twenty years. Even if the need for the school is declining this decade, in another ten to twenty years, it'll be back on the rise again.

This is why you don't sell off schools. It costs you far more in the long run than you'll ever make in the short term.
megpie71: AC Reno holding bomb, looking away from camera (about that raise)
Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015 06:46 am
Apparently-From: Kieran Sanchez (ni@jytaijin.com)
Subject: [Bulk] Employment opportunity : (0985546390441)
Reply-To: Kieran Sanchez (Kuksenko.Evgeniya@gmail.com)

Our company is glad to propose you to taking the office of a customer care manager. Please keep in mind, this is a beginner level office.

Job functions:

Supplying cellular service providers with a new commercial platform by our corporation.
User support and consultation.
Processing requests attributed to our platform icommerce.
Primary aid to our consumers in terms of working within the system.

We provide practice and a trial period.
Applicants are not needed bear peculiar experience with the system iCommerce or analogical systems.

Qualification and proficiency:
- Amenity and the ability of communicating with people
- Carefulness to details
- Skills in writing and editing of corporate-type texts due skills is a pro
- Time-management ability
- Flexibility, sufferance, sobriety

Paying conditions:
A monthly salary of 4000AUD for general working day or up to 2500AUD for part-time employment.

Practice period is remunerated.

It takes three weeks. You will get 400AUD a week.

During the process of instructions, you will familiarize with all operating stage regarding Icommerce platform. In the future, that will provide you the opportunity to orientate yourself and respond to all client matters easily .

If you are interested, we are eager to deliver you some additional information.

If we deem you an appropriate job applicant, we will contact you in the short term.

---
Это сообщение проверено на вирусы антивирусом Avast.
http://www.avast.com


So, scam flags flying:

1) Job "opportunity" sent at random to someone who isn't actually looking for work (I haven't been actively looking for work for about eight to ten months now). In a contracting job market (which we have at the moment - there are more unemployed people than there are jobs to go to) a legitimate employer doesn't need to be sending out recruiting letters at random.

2) Paying too much for the (poorly-described) work they're asking you to do. The wage they're offering is approximately $25 per hour ($4000 per month, divided by four weeks, divided by forty hours per week), and the work they appear to be offering is mostly either low-level stuff you'd expect to be paying minimum wage for, or the kind of thing you'd be expecting to employ much more qualified support staff for.

3) No mention of the company name (the mention of "avast" at the bottom is purely saying the Avast anti-virus program was used to scan it for viruses) or indeed of any company information at all.

4) "From" and "Reply-To" addresses are different domains, and appear to be different people (the "From" address is for a machinery company in China; the Reply-to is a gmail throwaway with an Eastern-European sounding name; neither of these match the name given for the person sending the emails).

5) Marked "[Bulk]" by Yahoo's email systems as it went through, so even though the email is apparently addressed to me, I'm betting they're actually sending the email to a large list of people.

6) Whoever wrote the body text speaks English as probably about a second language at best, possibly third or fourth. The grammar isn't appropriate, the word usage is clumsy, and there are a number of rather obvious mistakes in both.

If you've received one of these, the normal drill applies. Don't reply, don't send them anything, and don't take the job. If I receive more of them, I'll put the Apparently-From, Subject Line, and Reply-To addresses in comments below. If anyone reading this has received one and wants to add to the list, feel free.
megpie71: AC Cloud Strife looking toward camera in Sleeping Forest (Cloud 2)
Wednesday, June 17th, 2015 11:33 am
Context: Australian, female, forties, fan since first seeing the game on my brother's Playstation back in 1997, own and have played the original Playstation version of the game (played on my PS2), Dirge of Cerberus (PS2) and Crisis Core (PSP), plus the PC re-vamp of FFVII with the MS-Paint mouths on the characters (on the PC, natch!). I also own both KH1 and KH2, as well as the original Dissidia, and a copy of Advent Children. I write Final Fantasy VII fanfiction (you can find them here on AO3). I don't currently own a PS4, but I'd certainly consider buying one (or a new gaming-quality PC) in order to play this remake if it's any good.

Dear Square Enix,

I have apparently been a very good girl this year, since you're planning to remake Final Fantasy VII with high definition graphics for the PS4. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Just the news alone is enough to make me squee and bounce in my chair making happy noises. As a long-time fan of the Final Fantasy franchise, and also of the Final Fantasy VII franchise itself, I offer the following suggestions. (Consider these a wish-list).

Details under the fold )

I can't full express how much I'm looking forward to this re-make, but it's currently a re-make I'm looking forward to with somewhat mixed feelings. Please, don't let the prevailing trends of 2015 affect the way you re-make a game which was brilliant in 1997, and which can still hold its own even today. The core of Final Fantasy VII for me was always the stories and the characters - never the visual effects. Please don't lose this core while you're adding in the visuals.

Sincerely,

Megpie71 (aka Meg).

PS: If you put Cloud in a pink wig in the Wall Market drag scene, I shall not be impressed. Please don't cheat and re-use your Lightning skins in that one, okay?
megpie71: "Well, when I was a little girl, I thought I'd like to become a scientist, so I became a scientist" (feminism)
Monday, June 8th, 2015 11:39 am
Found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/opinion/sunday/what-makes-a-woman.html

Okay, first thoughts about the first few paragraphs: this comes across as very TERF-y[1] at times.

Further thoughts on reading more of it: actually, come to think on it, this is not only a wonderful example of trans-exclusionary feminism, but also a wonderful example of the sort of feminism which makes me want to say "if this is feminism, I don't want to be identified as feminist!"

Read more... )

I agree with this writer there's a lot of work men need to do on the way masculinity is defined and presented (and if she'd pointed out the complete lack of enthusiasm for the job demonstrated by the majority of persons identifying as male, I'd have agreed with her even more). But quite frankly, I don't see that attempting to lock transwomen out of the definition of "women as a whole" is a good move to get this work started. Trans identity is already gatekept by the medical community and the psychological and psychiatric community, not to mention the trans-erasing radical feminist community. I seriously doubt mainstream feminism needs to step up to the plate.


[1] Trans-Erasing Radical Feminism - the sort of feminism which basically states flat out that transwomen aren't "real" women because they weren't born with the correct genitalia.
[2] Can I just say, I have to wonder about when organised feminism became, by default, a movement intended solely for those women who were considered attractive by men?
[3] This can include things like requiring the permission of her husband, if she's married, or of her parents if she isn't - this for a fully functional adult with no mental illnesses or developmental impairments.
megpie71: Photo of sign reading "Those who throw objects at the crocodiles will be asked to retrieve them." (Crocodiles)
Thursday, May 28th, 2015 11:18 am
Item the first )

Item the Second )

So I'm having a nice quiet day of smug satisfaction at my own perspicacity. Given the rest of the day involves my jerk-brain telling me I'm useless, hopeless and won't achieve anything (to the point where I'm having to take photos of the housework as I'm doing it to prove the wretched thing wrong) it's nice for the external world to give me a bit of validation.
megpie71: AC Reno holding bomb, looking away from camera (about that raise)
Tuesday, May 19th, 2015 08:09 am
Have another employment offer scammer. Just arrived a few minutes ago (and apparently arrived at 9.27am today, which is intriguing, since it's only 8.07am on the clock... I love getting mail from the future).

From: yiyingyan62@163.com (apparent name: Brennan Dean)
Reply-To: hr_manager_1@mail.com (note the throwaway email address, very professional!)
Subject: [Bulk] Employment opportunity

Good day
Please read my proposal till the end.
I'm glad offer to you the Logistics Manager position.

Logistic manager is the first point of contact for external customers and suppliers for any queries regarding sales orders and deliveries whilst taking responsibility for the validation of invoices from distribution companies.
Company offers a trial employment agreement. The employee's wage shall be 100-300USD for each task. The training principle and schedule are free and organized for you without current job. According to the results of the trial period Company invites you to the interview and offers contract. The previous job experience at events industry is not required. This is a home based position during term.
Reply me via email to request more information.


Okay, so which scam flags is this flying?:

1) Contacted me out of nowhere to alert me of this "offer", even though I'm not actively looking for work at present. (I also don't have any recognisable skill in logistics - but see 3).
2) Throwaway email address in Reply-To field, which is different to the email address in the From field.
3) Not sent to my email address (and the "[Bulk]" marker is confirmation from yahoo that it's spam) - the email it is apparently to begins with the same first four letters as my own, so I'm suspecting alphabet attack on a number of domains.
4) Wage isn't in the currency I use (I'm in Australia; while being paid in US dollars would be nice, it would also entail fees from my bank).
5) Wage is entirely too high for the job description (and the job description is extremely vague - what am I supposed to be doing again?
6) What's the company name again? Doesn't appear to be mentioned. It appears to be within the "events industry", but that tells me less than nothing.
7) They're offering you a "trial employment agreement" and then a job interview and full employment based on the results of that trial... but you really do need to contact this person for more information so they can find out whether they have the right fish on the line.

As always, don't reply, don't send them anything with your personal details, and don't take the job.

Update 21 MAY 2015

New copy of the same email with one minor variation - new first line: I'm a HR manager of Food and Bakery Sales Company.

From: mil@productosmondino.com (Curran Grimes)
Reply-To: hrempl2@gmail.com (Curran Grimes) - still a throwaway email address, how professional!
Subject: [Bulk] Position available

Still an alphabet attack (not sent to my email address specifically) and still a scam.

If I get any more of these in the next few days, I'll update further.

Update 23 MAY 2015

Two of them in the mail today. These were both directly addressed to me, but still marked as [Bulk], so presumably they're still doing alphabet attacks.

Number One - Subject line: [Bulk] Fresh job
Apparently-from: Reuben Walters (david@throughalens.com)
Reply-To: Reuben Walters (hrempl2@gmail.com)

First few lines: Good day
I'm a HR manager of Food and Bakery Sales Company.
It's official career opportunity from Machinery sales company � Logistics Manager.


Number Two - Subject Line: [Bulk] Job offer
Apparently-From: Andrew Michael (syditup@hntele.com)
Reply-To: Andrew Michael (hrempl2@gmail.com) (Note same throwaway reply-to email as the previous one. Someone really wants a bite from this one).

First few lines: Good day
I'm a HR manager of Food and Bakery Sales Company.
it's official offer to Logistics Manager position.


Any further copies of this, I'll put new addresses and such into replies to this entry.